Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership

Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership

Mario P. Fields Mario P. Fields
63 minute read

Unarmored Talks Podcast: Devastating Combat Injuries Didn't Stop a Marine from LEADING.

Retired Marine Master Gunnery Sergeant Adam Walker was interviewed by Mario P. Fields, host of Unarmored Talk Podcast, about an experience during his 2004 deployment to Iraq where he was wounded in combat but still tried to lead his men.During the Battle of Husaybah, Walker was hit by grenade shrapnel in his arm and an AK-47 round went through his hamstring. He set up a casualty collection point with his squad in a house.

Despite being wounded, Walker still felt obligated as the senior leader to check on his Marines on the roof providing security. However, due to his injuries he became lightheaded and realized he had to fully trust his men to handle things without him micromanaging. Walker expressed no emotions of despair or regret during the situation, he was solely focused on caring for the young Marines under his charge. (Title: Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership)

Devastating Combat Injuries Didn't Stop this Marine from LEADING

His only fear was remaining in the vulnerable house after dark. After a few hours, reinforcements arrived to evacuate the casualties. Walker was humbled by the selflessness of his wounded Marines who refused stretchers to keep more Marines available for security.

Key Quote: "Invest in relationships. Invest in your people, because they are your family."

Walker emphasized the importance of building trust through training and delegating authority to create an organization that can function even when leaders are incapacitated. His key lesson was to invest in people and relationships.

🔑 Key takeaways from Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership

  • Invest in relationships and build trust before challenges arise. Walker credits the strong bonds and trust between his Marines for their ability to perform well without his direct leadership when he was wounded.

  • Proper training empowers people to take initiative. The Marines were able to take decisive action without waiting for directives from Walker because of their high level of training.

  • Let go of ego when you cannot lead. Despite being the senior Marine present, Walker had to suppress his ego and let his Marines take charge when he was physically limited by his injuries.

  • Put your people first. Walker was focused on caring for his young Marines, not his own injuries. He was willing to endure pain to keep more Marines available for security.

👉🏾 Discussion Points:

  • The ability to let others take the lead when you are wounded or incapacitated as a leader.

  • How strong relationships and trust are critical for overcoming challenges.

  • Leading by example and putting your people's welfare above your own.

  • How proper training empowers people at all levels to take initiative and make decisions.

  • The emotions leaders struggle with when they cannot perform their perceived duties.

  • Letting go of ego and micromanaging in difficult situations.

Watch Full Episode: Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership

➡Adam's blog: https://lnkd.in/ggfDPpCw

➡Listen on Apple Podcasts: https://lnkd.in/gSkmkei

➡Connect to all of my socials on the Parade Deck: https://lnkd.in/gimz5ni6

Devastating Combat Injuries didn't Stop Leadership by Transcript by Buzzsprout

Mario P. Fields: 0:00

Welcome back to Unarmored Talk podcast. Thank you so much for listening and watching each episode and continue pleased to share with your friends and family members and colleagues, and don't forget to leave a rating or review if you feel this is a awesome show. And you can connect to all of my social media on the Parade Deck just looking at show notes, or you can put in the search engine Mario P Fields ParadeDeck.com and get all access to my social media. Well, let's get ready to interview another guest who is willing to remove their armor to help other people. Everyone, welcome back to Unarmored Talk podcast.

Good to see you, good to hear you, good to whatever's going on out there in the world. And another special. This is a special, exclusive episode with not just a Marine Corps veteran who did 75 years as an infantryman when he's my brother. We served in fourth Marine regiment camp swapped together, so I don't even feel like this is a guest. I feel like I'm having a virtual family reunion with another brother from my Marine Corps family, adam Walker. What's going on, man?

Adam Walker: 1:23

Hey, Mario, it's good to see you man and I appreciate the opportunity to be on you know unarmored podcast with the five foot three assassin.

Mario P. Fields: 1:31

You know I had to change that name when I shrunk. I went to the VA and they measured me and he said how, how far do you think you are? And I said five foot three. They said no, you're five foot two and a half. So I had to change my whole YouTube channel name man, and it's all them sappy plates.

Adam Walker: 1:47

You don't know what I'm saying. They compress your spine.

Mario P. Fields: 1:51

Right, right. Well, everyone, before we jump into this amazing interview tonight, if you will, and before I professionally introduced the guest today who's willing to remove his armor to help people develop a accurate way of thinking when life hits you with some emotional stuff, thank you, you know I'm gonna say it. Thank you so much everybody who's been watching, listening, sharing and supporting the YouTube channel the videos on an arm or talk playlist or the other videos on the YouTube channel and the audio continue to share, continue to follow, leave some rating and reviews on the podcast as we continue to do.

What to me is most important is making an impact on tomorrow's generation, right, the next generation of professionals, by making a positive impact on today's youth up at Pitt County, north, carol Lina Alrighty done with the news flash and the admin Everyone. Adam Walker is a retired master gunnery sergeant, united States Marine Corps. He is a prolific writer, so he's very humble person. So, adam, make sure you let them know how can they find you, follow you and be able to consume some of the amazing things that you're writing. And he does a lot more in the community. Adam, please tell the listeners and viewers a little bit about yourself, my friend.

Adam Walker: 3:23

We'll do Mario. First off, I just want to say I do appreciate the chance to come on. There's a lot of veteran led podcast out there, but what's different about yours, in my opinion, is that because of the scope of how you do unarmored and people kind of open themselves up, and because of the wide array of guests you have, I think you're a key component in helping bridge this military civilian divide, and so it's not just veterans over here in the corner Just talk to them worse towards one another, but you're allowing people to share lessons that are really cross cultural. So anyway, I appreciate the chance to come on there.

But a little about me. I grew up in Western North Carolina, graduated high school, on a Friday and Monday I was in boot camp and then I spent the next 25 years in the Marine Corps. I did three tours in Iraq and then I did my last five years in Okinawa, where you and I served together and I just had a wonderful, wonderful time and and you had a lot of adventures. You know, as JRR Tolkien said, sometimes adventures aren't very fun while you're having them, you know. So they were certainly some hard times, but I'm very grateful to be living in this season in life.

I live down just outside of Camp Lejeune and I still work with the Marines as a contractor and then, as you mentioned, I do. I do a bit of writing, and so if anyone wants to check anything out, they can check out my blog. It's called TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom and so linked on there are the various articles that I've published, mainly in the veteran community, but I've had things in the Marine Corps Gazette, leatherneck Magazine, the War Horse, we are the mighty and Eddie's Veterans Magazine, and so there's links on my blog to all of that work, some of our perspectives on war and essay, some of its leadership stuff and a lot of. It's just funny, you know, just got some short military humor stuff out there.

Mario P. Fields: 5:04

I like that to TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom. Anyone can learn from Adam Walker. I'm telling you guys, and thank you for the positive feedback you know of the Unarmored Talk podcast, so I appreciate you and all the previous guests if they serve to not, you know, have the courage to remove their armor to help other people. You know, discuss a life challenge or a challenge which let's get right into the topic. You know you mentioned 25 years. You know I love how you kind of you know shape, that Sometimes a journey may not be fun, and you know three combat tours and multiple deployments, and so let's kind of jump right into the topic. From my basic understanding, adam is one of your deployments. There was a situation where you lost the ability to lead right, the ability to do what you wanted to do, because of an injury or some sort. Talk to me what happened.

Adam Walker: 6:00

Yes, on my second of three deployments to Iraq. I was a platoon sergeant and an infantry battalion and the short of is we're in the battle of Hussayva in April 17, 2004. And it was a pretty big gunfight and I wanted that. Taken a piece of shrapnel in my arm from a grenade, it was dropped from the roof above me and then when it exploded, a piece of it went in my arm, a piece of it went in the magazine pouch on my hip and then burst into flames. And then when I turn around to take cover, someone opened up with an AK-47 from the roof and it tore through my hamstring so it went just in and out of my leg. So I had a gunshot wound to the leg, I had shrapnel to the arm and they were. I was traveling with a squad that had a Lance Corporal Squad Leader and there were two other injuries in the squad, one of them being the squad leader and one being a PFC.

He was getting ready to turn 19 the next day, and so we were. We didn't have communication with the rest of the unit and we set up a. We basically occupied a house and set up a casualty collection point until we could figure things out, and so there were some bad guys in the house and we got them under security to take care of them. We put the family in the back so they would stay safe, and half of the squad went on the roof to continue to fight and provide security while we figured out what we're going to do. And there were a couple of Marines that were with the combined anti-armor team right, the CAT team Two Marines and a corpsman. They brought the corpsman up to us because they heard casualties, so they brought the corpsman to us and when I got in the house and looked around I was trying to figure out what we're going to do.

But this Marine Sergeant right, so he was one rank below me. He had come up with a captain. He approaches me, he holds a GPS and he says I know where we are, I'm going for help, and I thought that's a great idea. I said that's a really good plan and then I said let's make sure that we have security on the roof before you go. Once security was set, he bounded back and so we were in this house about two and a half, maybe three hours when my company, gunny, came up with some Marines and some stretchers. But what I had kind of alluded to before. The limitations I had is, you know, as a platoon Sergeant, I was the senior guy there and I felt an obligation as a leader to go check on the guys. But I had these wounds, so I had the hole in my leg, the shrapnel in my arm, but in addition to the pain, I was feeling like really lightheaded.

So when I tried to go up on the stairs and check on the guys, I got real lightheaded and I had to place my hand against the wall and almost fell down. I remember the corpsman and the other Marines were like hey, stassner, you need to sit down, you need to sit down. But as a leader I felt compelled like I need to go up there. But I reached this physical limitation where I said, well, if I pass out I'm going to be more of a liability than I am, you know, trying to meet my obligations as a leader. And so, although I would tell you that I trust my guys, because of my limitations with the wounds, I had to really trust them Right. So they were on the roof. I couldn't go up there and inspect them, you know, give them any guidance or anything. I just had to trust that the squad leader, the Lance Corporal up there, that he was going to do the right thing and you know Adam and Farmeh.

Mario P. Fields: 9:09

I just wanted to listen to the viewers to grasp this. I'm listening to you. You know you don't just have injuries, you have fragmentation. You know you have shrapnel from a grenade and then you have and what's the round size of an AK-47? 7.62 millimeters 7.62, if you're watching the video, it's probably about that big and if you're listening, I challenge you. I don't challenge you. I ask that you get on the YouTube channel and watch this video. So you have a 7.62 round that went through your leg. You have the shrapnel from a grenade, two and a half to three hours since your injuries, and you're still trying to lead.

Adam Walker: 10:00

Yeah, we know the Marine Corps. They do a couple of things. One they create in individuals. A phrase we use is a bias for action. Right, that means you're going to do something. You don't just sit around and you don't wait. You have a bias, a predisposition to take action. The other thing the Marines teach at leaders of all levels is to delegate authority, and so one of the reasons why I could trust my people number one it was a well-trained unit. Sometimes you hear the phrase that people rise to the occasion, but the combat veterans will tell you that that's not exactly true. Marines default to their level of training.

So if your organization is well-trained, then trust is going to be a whole lot better there. And if you have an organization where you delegate authority down to the lowest level it's a well-trained unit and there's a bias for action then you can trust your people. And so I was put in a place where that wasn't a conscious choice. It was placed upon me because I didn't have another choice. I had to trust the guys. But fortunately the circumstances were such that I could trust them and not to give away the entire story, but that Lance, corporal Squad Leader, was awarded the Silver Star for his actions that day as a Lance Corporal, and so and Adam, I love how, here it is, you're in charge per se.

Mario P. Fields: 11:16

You think of the senior ring, your staffs are compared to the, and now you had the choice for you to listen to the feedback, the advice they're giving you. Staff Sergeant, you need to relax, and for you to get to that point where you could now be led by those you were leading I believe is very commendable.

Adam Walker: 11:42

It's extremely humbling, because the decision to take this house and set up the casual collection point wasn't my decision. The plan to bound back and do a physical link up for the Aden Letter Team to basically get help, that wasn't my plan either. And then obviously, I wasn't on the roof and the Marines performed honorably up there to engage in the enemy and not engaging others who were there. So, yeah, I was just surrounded by quality people, and so that's why I say I was in charge per se, but really the decision-making was decentralized all the way down and none of the Marines looked at me to say what are we going to do next? That didn't happen, and so I'm just very humbled by that.

Mario P. Fields: 12:23

Wow, and I love too how you talked about people. Don't rise to the occasion. That's an inaccurate belief, that's right. That metaphor, believe, cliche, whatever you want to use, we trained, well-trained, well-developed, not just a military unit, any company, any organization. Well-trained we'll talk to this episode well-trained Marines and sailors, where that level of trust was built well before you went into that situation.

Adam Walker: 12:59

Yeah, and when you have a well-trained organization and then we have a decentralized authority, you build an atmosphere where trust is standard fare, but you build a relationship where it's like a family, and not only is that good for the overall organization, but when an individual perhaps a leader has a moment of self-doubt or a moment of self-indecisiveness, it doesn't become a crisis, because you're part of an organization and the organization will carry you through that moment of indecision or that moment of doubt. The organization carries you through and it's something that you're a part of.

Mario P. Fields: 13:37

Now, here you are. You take a name. You're waiting to be mad at that because you don't know the extent of the injuries At any point. Did you feel an emotion of despair, an emotion of regret? Did you experience any emotions at this point, and what were?

Adam Walker: 13:57

So I didn't have any emotions of despair or panic. As a leader. Actually, I think it's a little bit easier not to think about yourself because you have other people that you're responsible for. So I was concerned with the guys that were around me because they were it was probably not one of them older than 22. So they're out between the ages of 18, 22. So they're pretty young guys. I was about to turn 27. So I was kind of salty, you know, as a 27 year old.

Mario P. Fields: 

Welcome back to unarmored talk podcast. Thank you so much for listening and watching each episode and continue pleased to share with your friends and family members and colleagues, and don't forget to leave a rating or review if you feel this is a awesome show. And you can connect to all of my social media on the parade deck just looking at show notes, or you can put in the search engine Mario P Fields parade deck and get all access to my social media. Well, let's get ready to interview another guest who is willing to remove their armor to help other people. Everyone, welcome back to unarmored talk podcast.

Good to see you, good to hear you, good to whatever's going on out there in the world. And another special. This is a special, exclusive episode with not just a Marine Corps veteran who did 75 years as an infantryman when he's my brother. We served in fourth Marine regiment camp swapped together, so I don't even feel like this is a guest. I feel like I'm having a virtual family reunion with another brother from my Marine Corps family, adam Walker. What's going on, man?

Adam Walker: 

Hey, mario, it's good to see you man and I appreciate the opportunity to be on you know unarmored podcast with the five foot three assassin.

Mario P. Fields: 

You know I had to change that name when I shrunk. I went to the VA and they measured me and he said how, how far do you think you are? And I said five foot three. They said no, you're five foot two and a half. So I had to change my whole YouTube channel name man, and it's all them sappy plates.

Adam Walker: 

You don't know what I'm saying. They compress your spine.

Mario P. Fields: 

Right, right. Well, everyone, before we jump into this amazing interview tonight, if you will, and before I professionally introduced the guest today who's willing to remove his armor to help people develop a accurate way of thinking when life hits you with some emotional stuff, thank you, you know I'm gonna say it. Thank you so much everybody who's been watching, listening, sharing and supporting the YouTube channel the videos on an arm or talk playlist or the other videos on the YouTube channel and the audio continue to share, continue to follow, leave some rating and reviews on the podcast as we continue to do.

What to me is most important is making an impact on tomorrow's generation, right, the next generation of professionals, by making a positive impact on today's youth up at Pitt County, north, carol Lina Alrighty done with the news flash and the admin Everyone. Adam Walker is a retired master gunnery sergeant, united States Marine Corps. He is a prolific writer, so he's very humble person. So, adam, make sure you let them know how can they find you, follow you and be able to consume some of the amazing things that you're writing. And he does a lot more in the community. Adam, please tell the listeners and viewers a little bit about yourself, my friend.

Adam Walker: 

We'll do Mario. First off, I just want to say I do appreciate the chance to come on. There's a lot of veteran led podcast out there, but what's different about yours, in my opinion, is that because of the scope of how you do unarmored and people kind of open themselves up, and because of the wide array of guests you have, I think you're a key component in helping bridge this military civilian divide, and so it's not just veterans over here in the corner Just talk to them worse towards one another, but you're allowing people to share lessons that are really cross cultural.

So anyway, I appreciate the chance to come on there. But a little about me. I grew up in Western North Carolina, graduated high school, on a Friday and Monday I was in boot camp and then I spent the next 25 years in the Marine Corps. I did three tours in Iraq and then I did my last five years in Okinawa, where you and I served together and I just had a wonderful, wonderful time and and you had a lot of adventures. You know, as JRR Tolkien said, sometimes adventures aren't very fun while you're having them, you know. So they were certainly some hard times, but I'm very grateful to be living in this season in life.

I live down just outside of Camp Lejeune and I still work with the Marines as a contractor and then, as you mentioned, I do. I do a bit of writing, and so if anyone wants to check anything out, they can check out my blog. It's called TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom and so linked on there are the various articles that I've published, mainly in the veteran community, but I've had things in the Marine Corps Gazette, leatherneck Magazine, the War Horse, we are the mighty and Eddie's Veterans Magazine, and so there's links on my blog to all of that work, some of our perspectives on war and essay, some of its leadership stuff and a lot of. It's just funny, you know, just got some short military humor stuff out there.

Mario P. Fields: 

I like that to TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom. Anyone can learn from Adam Walker. I'm telling you guys, and thank you for the positive feedback you know of the Unarmored Talk podcast, so I appreciate you and all the previous guests if they serve to not, you know, have the courage to remove their armor to help other people. You know, discuss a life challenge or a challenge which let's get right into the topic. You know you mentioned 25 years. You know I love how you kind of you know shape, that Sometimes a journey may not be fun, and you know three combat tours and multiple deployments, and so let's kind of jump right into the topic. From my basic understanding, adam is one of your deployments. There was a situation where you lost the ability to lead right, the ability to do what you wanted to do, because of an injury or some sort. Talk to me what happened.

Adam Walker: 

Yes, on my second of three deployments to Iraq. I was a platoon sergeant and an infantry battalion and the short of is we're in the battle of Hussayva in April 17, 2004. And it was a pretty big gunfight and I wanted that. Taken a piece of shrapnel in my arm from a grenade, it was dropped from the roof above me and then when it exploded, a piece of it went in my arm, a piece of it went in the magazine pouch on my hip and then burst into flames. And then when I turn around to take cover, someone opened up with an AK-47 from the roof and it tore through my hamstring so it went just in and out of my leg. So I had a gunshot wound to the leg, I had shrapnel to the arm and they were. I was traveling with a squad that had a Lance Corporal Squad Leader and there were two other injuries in the squad, one of them being the squad leader and one being a PFC.

He was getting ready to turn 19 the next day, and so we were. We didn't have communication with the rest of the unit and we set up a. We basically occupied a house and set up a casualty collection point until we could figure things out, and so there were some bad guys in the house and we got them under security to take care of them. We put the family in the back so they would stay safe, and half of the squad went on the roof to continue to fight and provide security while we figured out what we're going to do. And there were a couple of Marines that were with the combined anti-armor team right, the CAT team Two Marines and a corpsman. They brought the corpsman up to us because they heard casualties, so they brought the corpsman to us and when I got in the house and looked around I was trying to figure out what we're going to do.

But this Marine Sergeant right, so he was one rank below me. He had come up with a captain. He approaches me, he holds a GPS and he says I know where we are, I'm going for help, and I thought that's a great idea. I said that's a really good plan and then I said let's make sure that we have security on the roof before you go. Once security was set, he bounded back and so we were in this house about two and a half, maybe three hours when my company, gunny, came up with some Marines and some stretchers.

But what I had kind of alluded to before. The limitations I had is, you know, as a platoon Sergeant, I was the senior guy there and I felt an obligation as a leader to go check on the guys. But I had these wounds, so I had the hole in my leg, the shrapnel in my arm, but in addition to the pain, I was feeling like really lightheaded. So when I tried to go up on the stairs and check on the guys, I got real lightheaded and I had to place my hand against the wall and almost fell down. I remember the corpsman and the other Marines were like hey, stassner, you need to sit down, you need to sit down. But as a leader I felt compelled like I need to go up there. But I reached this physical limitation where I said, well, if I pass out I'm going to be more of a liability than I am, you know, trying to meet my obligations as a leader. And so, although I would tell you that I trust my guys, because of my limitations with the wounds, I had to really trust them Right. So they were on the roof. I couldn't go up there and inspect them, you know, give them any guidance or anything. I just had to trust that the squad leader, the Lance Corporal up there, that he was going to do the right thing and you know Adam and Farmeh.

Mario P. Fields: 

I just wanted to listen to the viewers to grasp this. I'm listening to you. You know you don't just have injuries, you have fragmentation. You know you have shrapnel from a grenade and then you have and what's the round size of an AK-47? 7.62 millimeters 7.62, if you're watching the video, it's probably about that big and if you're listening, I challenge you. I don't challenge you. I ask that you get on the YouTube channel and watch this video. So you have a 7.62 round that went through your leg. You have the shrapnel from a grenade, two and a half to three hours since your injuries, and you're still trying to lead.

Adam Walker: 

Yeah, we know the Marine Corps. They do a couple of things. One they create in individuals. A phrase we use is a bias for action. Right, that means you're going to do something. You don't just sit around and you don't wait. You have a bias, a predisposition to take action. The other thing the Marines teach at leaders of all levels is to delegate authority, and so one of the reasons why I could trust my people number one it was a well-trained unit. Sometimes you hear the phrase that people rise to the occasion, but the combat veterans will tell you that that's not exactly true. Marines default to their level of training. So if your organization is well-trained, then trust is going to be a whole lot better there. And if you have an organization where you delegate authority down to the lowest level it's a well-trained unit and there's a bias for action then you can trust your people. And so I was put in a place where that wasn't a conscious choice. It was placed upon me because I didn't have another choice. I had to trust the guys. But fortunately the circumstances were such that I could trust them and not to give away the entire story, but that Lance, corporal Squad Leader, was awarded the Silver Star for his actions that day as a Lance Corporal, and so and Adam, I love how, here it is, you're in charge per se.

Mario P. Fields: 

You think of the senior ring, your staffs are compared to the, and now you had the choice for you to listen to the feedback, the advice they're giving you. Staff Sergeant, you need to relax, and for you to get to that point where you could now be led by those you were leading I believe is very commendable.

Adam Walker: 

It's extremely humbling, because the decision to take this house and set up the casual collection point wasn't my decision. The plan to bound back and do a physical link up for the Aden Letter Team to basically get help, that wasn't my plan either. And then obviously, I wasn't on the roof and the Marines performed honorably up there to engage in the enemy and not engaging others who were there. So, yeah, I was just surrounded by quality people, and so that's why I say I was in charge per se, but really the decision-making was decentralized all the way down and none of the Marines looked at me to say what are we going to do next? That didn't happen, and so I'm just very humbled by that.

Mario P. Fields: 

Wow, and I love too how you talked about people. Don't rise to the occasion. That's an inaccurate belief, that's right. That metaphor, believe, cliche, whatever you want to use, we trained, well-trained, well-developed, not just a military unit, any company, any organization. Well-trained we'll talk to this episode well-trained Marines and sailors, where that level of trust was built well before you went into that situation.

Adam Walker: 

Yeah, and when you have a well-trained organization and then we have a decentralized authority, you build an atmosphere where trust is standard fare, but you build a relationship where it's like a family, and not only is that good for the overall organization, but when an individual perhaps a leader has a moment of self-doubt or a moment of self-indecisiveness, it doesn't become a crisis, because you're part of an organization and the organization will carry you through that moment of indecision or that moment of doubt. The organization carries you through and it's something that you're a part of.

Mario P. Fields: 

Now, here you are. You take a name. You're waiting to be mad at that because you don't know the extent of the injuries At any point. Did you feel an emotion of despair, an emotion of regret? Did you experience any emotions at this point, and what were?

Adam Walker: 

So I didn't have any emotions of despair or panic. As a leader. Actually, I think it's a little bit easier not to think about yourself because you have other people that you're responsible for. So I was concerned with the guys that were around me because they were it was probably not one of them older than 22. So they're out between the ages of 18, 22. So they're pretty young guys. I was about to turn 27. So I was kind of salty, you know, as a 27 year old.

Mario P. Fields: 

Now in middle age.

Adam Walker: 

I think 27 is youthful, but we need some Ben Gay at that point. Yeah, yeah. But I will tell you, the one bit of fear I did have was this is that I was afraid we were still going to be in that house after dark because the enemy, they knew the city better than we did and so the cover of darkness would give them an increased ability to move around and us not being able to track them and knowing that we didn't have communication. We already had injuries and were a couple of hours into the injuries. So I did have this slight feeling of dread that we would still be there after dark, but we weren't. Before dark again, my company Gunny and some Marines with stretchers came, you know, beaten up on feet and to bell us out of there.

Mario P. Fields: 

Isn't that amazing. The fear that you, the emotional fear you experienced, was the fear to be in a situation that you cannot provide adequately for those you're leading. That's powerful, ladies and gentlemen, everyone you know again, having not the fear of your own life, I mean again, and I'm sure you still bleed and try to figure these things out. But Adam Walker hit. The emotion of fear he experienced was we got to be able to do something before that sun drops, because the probability of my folks right, the folks I'm leading and managing they, may be in greater danger, you know, than what they are.

Adam Walker: 

And I'll tell you two very powerful things that happened once they showed up with the stretchers. Number one, the Marine that was wounded the worst. We put him on a stretcher. And then they looked at me and they said, hey, that's not getting a stretcher. And I said, no, I can make it back, right. And I said that because I knew that if I got on a stretcher it would take two to four Marines to carry me, and that's two to four Marines, that's not being able to. You know, those are rifles to get security. I said, well, I can make it. But I looked at the squad leader who was wounded and I told him get in the stretcher.

And he said I'm good. And then you know, I'm in charge, right? I said get in the stretcher, and he looked at me very fiercely. He said I'm good. And I really had like tears of pride in my eyes because, without communicating any further, I realized he's a leader just like me. He knows the cost of him getting in a stretcher, just like I do, and he's saying I can make it a little bit longer. And so then that allowed more Marines to maintain security when we're bound back, and that one Marine that was in the stretcher. He didn't lay there like a victim, no, he was laying in the stretcher with his rifle, providing security for the guys carrying his stretcher. Wow, and I would tell you that, and these are very young men and I just seeing them be so concerned with the rest of the team, not with themselves, it was a very humbling thing and really, even to reflect on it, I get tears in my eyes of tears of pride with working with these guys. And it was a tough fight. When we got back to the company lines there were five Marines who had gotten killed in the fight. So they're laid out under potchos beside me while I'm getting ready to get medevaced. And it's just having to get medevaced and leave while the rest of the unit goes back into the fight is one of the most difficult things I've ever had to face.

But fortunately, I feel very fortunate that after being medevaced all the way back to 29 Palms, california, less than 90 days later I came back to Iraq to finish the deployment with the unit and I'm so incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to come back and finish with the boys because the men, because the day we came back the unit had gotten hit and three guys from the platoon got killed as I was making my way back, and so I got back just in time for the memorial service. And then they provided me the opportunity to come right back and take over my platoon again and say, all right, fellas, we still got a couple of months ago, let's get our head in the game and let's try to finish this. And another kind of sad part of that is my company, gunny, a few weeks, the one who came to bell us out with the stretchers he got killed a few weeks later, and so he didn't come home from that deployment.

Mario P. Fields: 

Well, adam, you know I know you're having lots of fun. I don't say busy anymore because I know you, man, and you are doing some wonderful things, and so, before I let you go to continue to inspire the world one, my hearts and prayers continue to go out with those families and those Marines that were lost when you were there, and also those who are still struggling and dealing with those memories. Because, you know, my belief is we grieve for quite some time, and so my hats off to you for removing your courage. And again, especially, you know my prayers and thoughts for the Marines we lost. Looking back on everything, I mean, you know the ability, the trust, people around you, the ability to train and develop before you even go into the occasion, and then your ability to continue to lead and manage, man, you know, with these significant injuries, if you had to give a person one piece of advice that you've learned from that very, very challenging experience, man, what would you give?

Adam Walker: 

them. If it was done, the one thing I would say invest in people. Relationships matter, and I've often told Marines that the Marine Corps, above all, is a core of Marines, and so it's all about people. So invest in relationship, invest in your people, because they are your family.

Mario P. Fields: 

Well, you've invested in me, you made my life easier camp Schwab and 4th Marine. So I can tell, I can say that personally that man, I love working with you. I would work with you forever and you definitely invested in this now 5 foot 2 and a half guy.

Adam Walker: 

Oh, yeah, yeah. And you know we realized how small the Marine Corps was because your roommate at DI School is a good buddy of mine from the grunts Right and so realize just how small the Marine Corps was.

Mario P. Fields: 

Where everybody you guys heard it. Lots of amazing tips that you can apply to your life during any challenge that can be a crisis to you. And, just like Adam said, you know, be intentional. Invest in people. Invest in people, adam, thank you, tell your family. I said hello and I hope to see you at the next great beard luncheon. Man on base. Yes, sir, see you there. Brother, make sure I put a picture in the overlay. Well, everyone, until next time. Thank you again for supporting the show and you guys know the deal. God bless you, god bless your families and God bless your friends. And be safe until next time. Thank you for listening to this most recent episode and remember you can listen and watch all of the previous episodes on my YouTube channel. The best way to connect to me and all of my social media is follow me on the parade deck, that is wwwparadecom, or you can click on the link in the show notes. I'll see you guys soon.Mario P. Fields: 

Welcome back to unarmored talk podcast. Thank you so much for listening and watching each episode and continue pleased to share with your friends and family members and colleagues, and don't forget to leave a rating or review if you feel this is a awesome show. And you can connect to all of my social media on the parade deck just looking at show notes, or you can put in the search engine Mario P Fields parade deck and get all access to my social media. Well, let's get ready to interview another guest who is willing to remove their armor to help other people. Everyone, welcome back to unarmored talk podcast. Good to see you, good to hear you, good to whatever's going on out there in the world. And another special. This is a special, exclusive episode with not just a Marine Corps veteran who did 75 years as an infantryman when he's my brother. We served in fourth Marine regiment camp swapped together, so I don't even feel like this is a guest. I feel like I'm having a virtual family reunion with another brother from my Marine Corps family, adam Walker. What's going on, man?

Adam Walker: 

Hey, mario, it's good to see you man and I appreciate the opportunity to be on you know unarmored podcast with the five foot three assassin.

Mario P. Fields: 

You know I had to change that name when I shrunk. I went to the VA and they measured me and he said how, how far do you think you are? And I said five foot three. They said no, you're five foot two and a half. So I had to change my whole YouTube channel name man, and it's all them sappy plates.

Adam Walker: 

You don't know what I'm saying. They compress your spine.

Mario P. Fields: 

Right, right. Well, everyone, before we jump into this amazing interview tonight, if you will, and before I professionally introduced the guest today who's willing to remove his armor to help people develop a accurate way of thinking when life hits you with some emotional stuff, thank you, you know I'm gonna say it. Thank you so much everybody who's been watching, listening, sharing and supporting the YouTube channel the videos on an arm or talk playlist or the other videos on the YouTube channel and the audio continue to share, continue to follow, leave some rating and reviews on the podcast as we continue to do.

What to me is most important is making an impact on tomorrow's generation, right, the next generation of professionals, by making a positive impact on today's youth up at Pitt County, north, carol Lina Alrighty done with the news flash and the admin Everyone. Adam Walker is a retired master gunnery sergeant, united States Marine Corps. He is a prolific writer, so he's very humble person. So, adam, make sure you let them know how can they find you, follow you and be able to consume some of the amazing things that you're writing. And he does a lot more in the community. Adam, please tell the listeners and viewers a little bit about yourself, my friend.

Devastating Combat Injuries Didn't Stop this Marine from LEADING

Adam Walker: 

We'll do Mario. First off, I just want to say I do appreciate the chance to come on. There's a lot of veteran led podcast out there, but what's different about yours, in my opinion, is that because of the scope of how you do unarmored and people kind of open themselves up, and because of the wide array of guests you have, I think you're a key component in helping bridge this military civilian divide, and so it's not just veterans over here in the corner Just talk to them worse towards one another, but you're allowing people to share lessons that are really cross cultural. So anyway, I appreciate the chance to come on there. But a little about me.

I grew up in Western North Carolina, graduated high school, on a Friday and Monday I was in boot camp and then I spent the next 25 years in the Marine Corps. I did three tours in Iraq and then I did my last five years in Okinawa, where you and I served together and I just had a wonderful, wonderful time and and you had a lot of adventures. You know, as JRR Tolkien said, sometimes adventures aren't very fun while you're having them, you know. So they were certainly some hard times, but I'm very grateful to be living in this season in life. I live down just outside of Camp Lejeune and I still work with the Marines as a contractor and then, as you mentioned, I do. I do a bit of writing, and so if anyone wants to check anything out, they can check out my blog.

It's called TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom and so linked on there are the various articles that I've published, mainly in the veteran community, but I've had things in the Marine Corps Gazette, leatherneck Magazine, the War Horse, we are the mighty and Eddie's Veterans Magazine, and so there's links on my blog to all of that work, some of our perspectives on war and essay, some of its leadership stuff and a lot of. It's just funny, you know, just got some short military humor stuff out there.

Mario P. Fields: 

I like that to TakeItOnTheLeftFootcom. Anyone can learn from Adam Walker. I'm telling you guys, and thank you for the positive feedback you know of the Unarmored Talk podcast, so I appreciate you and all the previous guests if they serve to not, you know, have the courage to remove their armor to help other people. You know, discuss a life challenge or a challenge which let's get right into the topic. You know you mentioned 25 years. You know I love how you kind of you know shape, that Sometimes a journey may not be fun, and you know three combat tours and multiple deployments, and so let's kind of jump right into the topic. From my basic understanding, adam is one of your deployments. There was a situation where you lost the ability to lead right, the ability to do what you wanted to do, because of an injury or some sort. Talk to me what happened.

Adam Walker: 

Yes, on my second of three deployments to Iraq. I was a platoon sergeant and an infantry battalion and the short of is we're in the battle of Hussayva in April 17, 2004. And it was a pretty big gunfight and I wanted that. Taken a piece of shrapnel in my arm from a grenade, it was dropped from the roof above me and then when it exploded, a piece of it went in my arm, a piece of it went in the magazine pouch on my hip and then burst into flames. And then when I turn around to take cover, someone opened up with an AK-47 from the roof and it tore through my hamstring so it went just in and out of my leg. So I had a gunshot wound to the leg, I had shrapnel to the arm and they were.

I was traveling with a squad that had a Lance Corporal Squad Leader and there were two other injuries in the squad, one of them being the squad leader and one being a PFC. He was getting ready to turn 19 the next day, and so we were. We didn't have communication with the rest of the unit and we set up a. We basically occupied a house and set up a casualty collection point until we could figure things out, and so there were some bad guys in the house and we got them under security to take care of them. We put the family in the back so they would stay safe, and half of the squad went on the roof to continue to fight and provide security while we figured out what we're going to do. And there were a couple of Marines that were with the combined anti-armor team right, the CAT team Two Marines and a corpsman.

They brought the corpsman up to us because they heard casualties, so they brought the corpsman to us and when I got in the house and looked around I was trying to figure out what we're going to do. But this Marine Sergeant right, so he was one rank below me. He had come up with a captain. He approaches me, he holds a GPS and he says I know where we are, I'm going for help, and I thought that's a great idea. I said that's a really good plan and then I said let's make sure that we have security on the roof before you go. Once security was set, he bounded back and so we were in this house about two and a half, maybe three hours when my company, gunny, came up with some Marines and some stretchers. But what I had kind of alluded to before.

The limitations I had is, you know, as a platoon Sergeant, I was the senior guy there and I felt an obligation as a leader to go check on the guys. But I had these wounds, so I had the hole in my leg, the shrapnel in my arm, but in addition to the pain, I was feeling like really lightheaded. So when I tried to go up on the stairs and check on the guys, I got real lightheaded and I had to place my hand against the wall and almost fell down. I remember the corpsman and the other Marines were like hey, stassner, you need to sit down, you need to sit down.

But as a leader I felt compelled like I need to go up there. But I reached this physical limitation where I said, well, if I pass out I'm going to be more of a liability than I am, you know, trying to meet my obligations as a leader. And so, although I would tell you that I trust my guys, because of my limitations with the wounds, I had to really trust them Right. So they were on the roof. I couldn't go up there and inspect them, you know, give them any guidance or anything. I just had to trust that the squad leader, the Lance Corporal up there, that he was going to do the right thing and you know Adam and Farmeh.

Devastating Combat Injuries Didn't Stop this Marine from LEADING

Mario P. Fields: 

I just wanted to listen to the viewers to grasp this. I'm listening to you. You know you don't just have injuries, you have fragmentation. You know you have shrapnel from a grenade and then you have and what's the round size of an AK-47? 7.62 millimeters 7.62, if you're watching the video, it's probably about that big and if you're listening, I challenge you. I don't challenge you. I ask that you get on the YouTube channel and watch this video. So you have a 7.62 round that went through your leg. You have the shrapnel from a grenade, two and a half to three hours since your injuries, and you're still trying to lead.

Adam Walker: 

Yeah, we know the Marine Corps. They do a couple of things. One they create in individuals. A phrase we use is a bias for action. Right, that means you're going to do something. You don't just sit around and you don't wait. You have a bias, a predisposition to take action. The other thing the Marines teach at leaders of all levels is to delegate authority, and so one of the reasons why I could trust my people number one it was a well-trained unit. Sometimes you hear the phrase that people rise to the occasion, but the combat veterans will tell you that that's not exactly true.

Marines default to their level of training. So if your organization is well-trained, then trust is going to be a whole lot better there. And if you have an organization where you delegate authority down to the lowest level it's a well-trained unit and there's a bias for action then you can trust your people. And so I was put in a place where that wasn't a conscious choice. It was placed upon me because I didn't have another choice. I had to trust the guys. But fortunately the circumstances were such that I could trust them and not to give away the entire story, but that Lance, corporal Squad Leader, was awarded the Silver Star for his actions that day as a Lance Corporal, and so and Adam, I love how, here it is, you're in charge per se.

Mario P. Fields: 

You think of the senior ring, your staffs are compared to the, and now you had the choice for you to listen to the feedback, the advice they're giving you. Staff Sergeant, you need to relax, and for you to get to that point where you could now be led by those you were leading I believe is very commendable.

Adam Walker: 

It's extremely humbling, because the decision to take this house and set up the casual collection point wasn't my decision. The plan to bound back and do a physical link up for the Aden Letter Team to basically get help, that wasn't my plan either. And then obviously, I wasn't on the roof and the Marines performed honorably up there to engage in the enemy and not engaging others who were there. So, yeah, I was just surrounded by quality people, and so that's why I say I was in charge per se, but really the decision-making was decentralized all the way down and none of the Marines looked at me to say what are we going to do next? That didn't happen, and so I'm just very humbled by that.

Mario P. Fields: 

Wow, and I love too how you talked about people. Don't rise to the occasion. That's an inaccurate belief, that's right. That metaphor, believe, cliche, whatever you want to use, we trained, well-trained, well-developed, not just a military unit, any company, any organization. Well-trained we'll talk to this episode well-trained Marines and sailors, where that level of trust was built well before you went into that situation.

Adam Walker: 

Yeah, and when you have a well-trained organization and then we have a decentralized authority, you build an atmosphere where trust is standard fare, but you build a relationship where it's like a family, and not only is that good for the overall organization, but when an individual perhaps a leader has a moment of self-doubt or a moment of self-indecisiveness, it doesn't become a crisis, because you're part of an organization and the organization will carry you through that moment of indecision or that moment of doubt. The organization carries you through and it's something that you're a part of.

Mario P. Fields: 

Now, here you are. You take a name. You're waiting to be mad at that because you don't know the extent of the injuries At any point. Did you feel an emotion of despair, an emotion of regret? Did you experience any emotions at this point, and what were?

Adam Walker: 

So I didn't have any emotions of despair or panic. As a leader. Actually, I think it's a little bit easier not to think about yourself because you have other people that you're responsible for. So I was concerned with the guys that were around me because they were it was probably not one of them older than 22. So they're out between the ages of 18, 22. So they're pretty young guys. I was about to turn 27. So I was kind of salty, you know, as a 27 year old.

Mario P. Fields: 

Now in middle age.

Adam Walker: 

I think 27 is youthful, but we need some Ben Gay at that point. Yeah, yeah. But I will tell you, the one bit of fear I did have was this is that I was afraid we were still going to be in that house after dark because the enemy, they knew the city better than we did and so the cover of darkness would give them an increased ability to move around and us not being able to track them and knowing that we didn't have communication. We already had injuries and were a couple of hours into the injuries. So I did have this slight feeling of dread that we would still be there after dark, but we weren't. Before dark again, my company Gunny and some Marines with stretchers came, you know, beaten up on feet and to bell us out of there.

Mario P. Fields: 

Isn't that amazing. The fear that you, the emotional fear you experienced, was the fear to be in a situation that you cannot provide adequately for those you're leading. That's powerful, ladies and gentlemen, everyone you know again, having not the fear of your own life, I mean again, and I'm sure you still bleed and try to figure these things out. But Adam Walker hit. The emotion of fear he experienced was we got to be able to do something before that sun drops, because the probability of my folks right, the folks I'm leading and managing they, may be in greater danger, you know, than what they are.

Adam Walker: 

And I'll tell you two very powerful things that happened once they showed up with the stretchers. Number one, the Marine that was wounded the worst. We put him on a stretcher. And then they looked at me and they said, hey, that's not getting a stretcher. And I said, no, I can make it back, right. And I said that because I knew that if I got on a stretcher it would take two to four Marines to carry me, and that's two to four Marines, that's not being able to. You know, those are rifles to get security. I said, well, I can make it. But I looked at the squad leader who was wounded and I told him get in the stretcher. And he said I'm good. And then you know, I'm in charge, right? I said get in the stretcher, and he looked at me very fiercely. He said I'm good. And I really had like tears of pride in my eyes because, without communicating any further, I realized he's a leader just like me. He knows the cost of him getting in a stretcher, just like I do, and he's saying I can make it a little bit longer. And so then that allowed more Marines to maintain security when we're bound back, and that one Marine that was in the stretcher. He didn't lay there like a victim, no, he was laying in the stretcher with his rifle, providing security for the guys carrying his stretcher.

Wow, and I would tell you that, and these are very young men and I just seeing them be so concerned with the rest of the team, not with themselves, it was a very humbling thing and really, even to reflect on it, I get tears in my eyes of tears of pride with working with these guys. And it was a tough fight. When we got back to the company lines there were five Marines who had gotten killed in the fight. So they're laid out under potchos beside me while I'm getting ready to get medevaced. And it's just having to get medevaced and leave while the rest of the unit goes back into the fight is one of the most difficult things I've ever had to face. But fortunately, I feel very fortunate that after being medevaced all the way back to 29 Palms, california, less than 90 days later I came back to Iraq to finish the deployment with the unit and I'm so incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to come back and finish with the boys because the men, because the day we came back the unit had gotten hit and three guys from the platoon got killed as I was making my way back, and so I got back just in time for the memorial service.

And then they provided me the opportunity to come right back and take over my platoon again and say, all right, fellas, we still got a couple of months ago, let's get our head in the game and let's try to finish this. And another kind of sad part of that is my company, gunny, a few weeks, the one who came to bell us out with the stretchers he got killed a few weeks later, and so he didn't come home from that deployment.

Mario P. Fields: 

Well, adam, you know I know you're having lots of fun. I don't say busy anymore because I know you, man, and you are doing some wonderful things, and so, before I let you go to continue to inspire the world one, my hearts and prayers continue to go out with those families and those Marines that were lost when you were there, and also those who are still struggling and dealing with those memories. Because, you know, my belief is we grieve for quite some time, and so my hats off to you for removing your courage. And again, especially, you know my prayers and thoughts for the Marines we lost. Looking back on everything, I mean, you know the ability, the trust, people around you, the ability to train and develop before you even go into the occasion, and then your ability to continue to lead and manage, man, you know, with these significant injuries, if you had to give a person one piece of advice that you've learned from that very, very challenging experience, man, what would you give?

Adam Walker: 

them. If it was done, the one thing I would say invest in people. Relationships matter, and I've often told Marines that the Marine Corps, above all, is a core of Marines, and so it's all about people. So invest in relationship, invest in your people, because they are your family.

Mario P. Fields: 

Well, you've invested in me, you made my life easier camp Schwab and 4th Marine. So I can tell, I can say that personally that man, I love working with you. I would work with you forever and you definitely invested in this now 5 foot 2 and a half guy.

Adam Walker: 

Oh, yeah, yeah. And you know we realized how small the Marine Corps was because your roommate at DI School is a good buddy of mine from the grunts Right and so realize just how small the Marine Corps was.

Mario P. Fields: 

Where everybody you guys heard it. Lots of amazing tips that you can apply to your life during any challenge that can be a crisis to you. And, just like Adam said, you know, be intentional. Invest in people. Invest in people, adam, thank you, tell your family. I said hello and I hope to see you at the next great beard luncheon. Man on base. Yes, sir, see you there. Brother, make sure I put a picture in the overlay. Well, everyone, until next time. Thank you again for supporting the show and you guys know the deal. God bless you, god bless your families and God bless your friends. And be safe until next time. Thank you for listening to this most recent episode and remember you can listen and watch all of the previous episodes on my YouTube channel. The best way to connect to me and all of my social media is follow me on the parade deck, that is wwwparadecom, or you can click on the link in the show notes. I'll see you guys soon.

Adam Walker: 14:26

I think 27 is youthful, but we need some Ben Gay at that point. Yeah, yeah. But I will tell you, the one bit of fear I did have was this is that I was afraid we were still going to be in that house after dark because the enemy, they knew the city better than we did and so the cover of darkness would give them an increased ability to move around and us not being able to track them and knowing that we didn't have communication. We already had injuries and were a couple of hours into the injuries. So I did have this slight feeling of dread that we would still be there after dark, but we weren't. Before dark again, my company Gunny and some Marines with stretchers came, you know, beaten up on feet and to bell us out of there.

Mario P. Fields: 15:12

Isn't that amazing. The fear that you, the emotional fear you experienced, was the fear to be in a situation that you cannot provide adequately for those you're leading. That's powerful, ladies and gentlemen, everyone you know again, having not the fear of your own life, I mean again, and I'm sure you still bleed and try to figure these things out. But Adam Walker hit. The emotion of fear he experienced was we got to be able to do something before that sun drops, because the probability of my folks right, the folks I'm leading and managing they, may be in greater danger, you know, than what they are.

Adam Walker: 15:54

And I'll tell you two very powerful things that happened once they showed up with the stretchers. Number one, the Marine that was wounded the worst. We put him on a stretcher. And then they looked at me and they said, hey, that's not getting a stretcher. And I said, no, I can make it back, right. And I said that because I knew that if I got on a stretcher it would take two to four Marines to carry me, and that's two to four Marines, that's not being able to. You know, those are rifles to get security. I said, well, I can make it. But I looked at the squad leader who was wounded and I told him get in the stretcher. And he said I'm good. And then you know, I'm in charge, right? I said get in the stretcher, and he looked at me very fiercely. He said I'm good.

And I really had like tears of pride in my eyes because, without communicating any further, I realized he's a leader just like me. He knows the cost of him getting in a stretcher, just like I do, and he's saying I can make it a little bit longer. And so then that allowed more Marines to maintain security when we're bound back, and that one Marine that was in the stretcher. He didn't lay there like a victim, no, he was laying in the stretcher with his rifle, providing security for the guys carrying his stretcher. Wow, and I would tell you that, and these are very young men and I just seeing them be so concerned with the rest of the team, not with themselves, it was a very humbling thing and really, even to reflect on it, I get tears in my eyes of tears of pride with working with these guys. And it was a tough fight. When we got back to the company lines there were five Marines who had gotten killed in the fight. So they're laid out under potchos beside me while I'm getting ready to get medevaced.

And it's just having to get medevaced and leave while the rest of the unit goes back into the fight is one of the most difficult things I've ever had to face. But fortunately, I feel very fortunate that after being medevaced all the way back to 29 Palms, california, less than 90 days later I came back to Iraq to finish the deployment with the unit and I'm so incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to come back and finish with the boys because the men, because the day we came back the unit had gotten hit and three guys from the platoon got killed as I was making my way back, and so I got back just in time for the memorial service. And then they provided me the opportunity to come right back and take over my platoon again and say, all right, fellas, we still got a couple of months ago, let's get our head in the game and let's try to finish this. And another kind of sad part of that is my company, gunny, a few weeks, the one who came to bell us out with the stretchers he got killed a few weeks later, and so he didn't come home from that deployment.

Mario P. Fields: 18:32

Well, adam, you know I know you're having lots of fun. I don't say busy anymore because I know you, man, and you are doing some wonderful things, and so, before I let you go to continue to inspire the world one, my hearts and prayers continue to go out with those families and those Marines that were lost when you were there, and also those who are still struggling and dealing with those memories. Because, you know, my belief is we grieve for quite some time, and so my hats off to you for removing your courage. And again, especially, you know my prayers and thoughts for the Marines we lost. Looking back on everything, I mean, you know the ability, the trust, people around you, the ability to train and develop before you even go into the occasion, and then your ability to continue to lead and manage, man, you know, with these significant injuries, if you had to give a person one piece of advice that you've learned from that very, very challenging experience, man, what would you give?

Adam Walker: 19:41

them. If it was done, the one thing I would say invest in people. Relationships matter, and I've often told Marines that the Marine Corps, above all, is a core of Marines, and so it's all about people. So invest in relationship, invest in your people, because they are your family.

Mario P. Fields: 20:01

Well, you've invested in me, you made my life easier camp Schwab and 4th Marine. So I can tell, I can say that personally that man, I love working with you. I would work with you forever and you definitely invested in this now 5 foot 2 and a half guy.

Adam Walker: 20:15

Oh, yeah, yeah. And you know we realized how small the Marine Corps was because your roommate at DI School is a good buddy of mine from the grunts Right and so realize just how small the Marine Corps was.

Mario P. Fields: 20:28

Where everybody you guys heard it. Lots of amazing tips that you can apply to your life during any challenge that can be a crisis to you. And, just like Adam said, you know, be intentional. Invest in people. Invest in people, adam, thank you, tell your family. I said hello and I hope to see you at the next great beard luncheon. Man on base. Yes, sir, see you there. Brother, make sure I put a picture in the overlay. Well, everyone, until next time. Thank you again for supporting the show and you guys know the deal. God bless you, god bless your families and God bless your friends. And be safe until next time. Thank you for listening to this most recent episode and remember you can listen and watch all of the previous episodes on my YouTube channel. The best way to connect to me and all of my social media is follow me on the parade deck, that is wwwparadecom, or you can click on the link in the show notes. I'll see you guys soon.

Devastating Combat Injuries Didn't Stop this Marine from LEADING

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